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Humboldt

Image+Credits%3A+https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2FHumboldtBroncos%2Fstatus%2F977751462099927041+
Image Credits: https://twitter.com/HumboldtBroncos/status/977751462099927041

Image Credits: https://twitter.com/HumboldtBroncos/status/977751462099927041

Image Credits: https://twitter.com/HumboldtBroncos/status/977751462099927041

Emma Sieben, Editor-in-chief

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The junior hockey community is reeling after a bus carrying the Humboldt Broncos Junior Hockey team was T-boned by a semi-truck last Friday afternoon. The team was headed to Nipawin, Saskatchewan for a semi-final playoff game against the Nipawin Hawks. The crash, which occurred near Tisdale, about two hundred kilometres northeast of Saskatoon, killed fifteen people, including radio announcer Tyler Bieber, team captain Logan Schatz, and head coach Darcy Haugan. There were twenty-nine people on board at the time of the crash, and the other fourteen passengers were taken to hospital, some with critical injuries.

The driver of the semi was not injured during the crash, and was briefly detained for questioning, but has since been released. The RCMP have not yet determined the cause of the crash.

Learning about this tragedy hit me particularly hard, because as an athlete who has ridden on team buses countless times, a crash is almost beyond belief. The bus is a safe space, where you can listen to music, goof-off with your friends, do homework, or catch up on sleep. To have that security stripped away so suddenly makes one feel very vulnerable and weak. It is terrifying to hear of these incidents, because every bus ride I’ve ever been on flashes through my head, and I think “that could’ve been me.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau released a statement expressing his condolences via Twitter yesterday, stating that “[he] cannot imagine what [the] parents are going through, and [his] heart goes out to everyone affected by this terrible tragedy.” Thoughts and prayers continue to pour in, not only across the country, but across the world. U.S. President Donald Trump offered his “highest respect and condolences” to Prime Minister Trudeau over Twitter, as well.

NHL teams have already rallied around Humboldt. During last Saturday’s match-up between the Winnipeg Jets and the Chicago Blackhawks, the players wore “Broncos” on the backs of their jerseys instead of their individual names. This idea of playing for the name on the back of the shirt, instead of the front, was created to promote unity in the hockey community and to show support for the Humboldt community.

And that’s not all! People all over the world wore their sports jerseys in support of the Humboldt community on Thursday. Furthermore, a GoFundMe page has been set up to help the victims and families, and has raised over ten million dollars, as of this morning.

One thing I find heartening about this tragedy is the way that the global community has come together to mourn. It is encouraging to know that people will still unite to support and comfort a grieving community. It is our responsibility as Canadians, and as decent human beings, to be respectful to and to be a shoulder for the victims and their families in their time of need.

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